Protected: Mediation helps divorcing parties focus on real needs

Mediation helps divorcing parties focus on real needs This is the first part of a series on the different ways divorce can be settled. This article was first published 23 May, 2018 by TODAY .Author: PracticeForte Advisory Affiliate Lat Mun Loon of Amicus ConsultingI read with interest the reports “Divorce made less bitter with new mediation process” (May 18) and “Amicable divorce options not popular” (May 19).As a mediator, I affirm the direction taken by the courts and the Singapore Mediation Centre. A divorce should be settled as amicably as possible for the benefit of the children as well as everyone else involved.While divorce is a legal and social issue, it must first be seen as a painfully emotional family matter.Clients…

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Caught Between The Devil And The Deep Blue Sea

Project restructure family matters "CAUGHT BETWEEN THE DEVIL AND THE DEEP BLUE SEA". Interview & Article by: Emelia Kwa, a trainee at OTP Law Corporation. Published: 28 February, 2019 Interviewee’s name has been changed to protect the identity and privacy of all parties involved. “I don’t really know how I survived” are not the words you’d expect to hear from someone speaking about their marriage. However, in Peter’s case, what he expected to be a fairy-tale romance turned out to be a lot more complicated in reality. Peter’s story is not uncommon – every marriage has its challenges and couples may find themselves struggling to make sense of the difficulties and changes they are going through. However, as Peter’s case demonstrates,…

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Breaking down a marriage: How can it be done?

BREAKING DOWN A MARRIAGE: HOW CAN IT BE DONE? This is the first part of a series on the different ways divorce can be settled. This article was first published by OTP Law Corporation.Divorce is a harrowing process. Beyond the emotional trauma, there are typically a host of issues and complications, especially if there are children or substantial assets involved. These issues, big or small, need to be addressed before the divorce can be finalised.Sometimes, parties are able to come to an agreement on their own and thus result in an uncontested divorce. However, divorce will often be contested as spouses will usually not be able to totally agree on all aspects, especially for ancillary matters. In many cases, parties…

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Voice of The Unmarried Mother Heard

Voice of The Unmarried Mother Heard Image Source: Google This article is written by Susan Tay of OPT Law Corporation and is published in conjunction with PracticeForte's Project Relocation Initiative. Relocation Case Analysis ULA v UKZ –Voice of The Unmarried Mother Heard This article is written by Susan Tay of OTP Law Corporation. This article is published in conjunction with PracticeForte’s Project Relocation initiative. I am a mother of a 9 year old son. His dad, an Irish man who was not married to me, lived with his wife and 2 kids in New Zealand. Until my son was about 3, his family did not know anything about me or our son. In fact, it was I who called his wife…

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Mediation for Hague Convention and Relocation Cases

Mediation for Hague Convention & Relocation Cases - The Unfortunate Case of TSF v TSE Article By: Isabel Chew-Lau & Emelia Kwa If you want a grim illustration of how cross-border child cases can devolve, you need look no further than the recent Court of Appeal case of TSF v TSE. That case concerned an epic battle between parents for the custody of their child. It was a battle that spanned four years and two jurisdictions: Singapore and England. There, the parents had brought the child from England to Singapore when he was around a year old, to be looked after by his paternal grandparents while the mother completed her studies. Half a year later, the parents returned to Singapore, supposedly to…

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Between A Rock And A Hard Place – Case Study of UFZ V UFY

Between A Rock & A Hard Place - Case Study of UFZ v UFY Article By: PracticeForte Advisory Affiliate Ms. Amy Lim Cross-border marriages are becoming increasingly common in a globalised world.  Unfortunately, when some of these marriages break down, an application may have to be made in Court if one parent wishes to relocate with the children.This gives rise to the proverbial “between a rock and a hard place” decision which the Court must make. Do they decide in favour of the parent seeking to (typically) return to a home country, thus leaving one parent behind? Or do they decide against the relocation, thus forcing a party who wishes to leave to stay behind in a place they may…

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Hague Convention on International Child Abduction: The Other Side

Hague Convention On International Child Abduction - The Other Side of the Story Article By: PracticeForte Advisory Affiliate Ms. June Lim You may be familiar with the story of Singapore’s only Caucasian UBER driver: https://www.straitstimes.com/singapore/uber-mum-driven-to-make-kids-lives-easierAnna moved to Singapore from the UK with her family in 2010, becoming a Permanent Resident in 2013. Her marriage ended in 2015 due to her husband’s infidelity. Following a Hague Convention application in the UK in 2015, Anna was compelled to return to Singapore with her children.While Anna was fortunate to be able to secure a job with UBER due to her Permanent Residency status, she still struggled financially post-divorce. Although her husband paid maintenance that covered rent for her family’s apartment, her children’s local…

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Mediation for *Hague and Relocation Cases

Mediation for *Hague Convention and Relocation Cases* Article By: PracticeForte Advisory Affiliate Ms. Susan Tay of OTP Law Corporation Cross-border family disputes: Hague and Relocation CasesSingapore has picked up a reputation as a metropolitan, expat-friendly city. In fact, 1 in 3 marriages in Singapore now involve at least one foreigner.No doubt this is a boon for multiculturalism. But when it comes to family disputes that involve children, a cross-border marriage could complicate matters. A breakdown of a cross-border marriage makes it much more likely that one parent wants to leave the country with the children. After all, foreign parents usually maintain a connection with their home countries which they gravitate when things take a turn for the worse.If the child…

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On the Move – Parental Relocation in Singapore

On The Move Article By: PracticeForte Advisory Affiliate Firm Rajan Chettiar LLC I.                    IntroductionWith the advent of globalization, the number of cross-border marriages is on the rise. Singapore, in particular, is a typical destination country for cross-border marriages in Asia, with the proportion of marriages between a Singapore and a non-citizen spouse rising from 32.8% to 38.7% during the 1998-2008 period.[1] Correspondingly, the modern Singaporean family is more likely to be the product of a cross-border marriage, the breakdown of which would potential raise complex cross-border issues, such as applications for relocation. After divorce, a parent may want to bring his/her children overseas in search of a new life, or to dive back into the familiar comfort and support provided by…

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Basic Guide To Mediation

Basic Guide To Mediation Article By: Emelia Kwa What is mediation?Mediation is focused on finding a solution that is agreed upon by all parties involved and which best addresses their concerns. This involves a neutral mediator who helps guide the parties towards reaching such a resolution.What is the process like?For mediation to work, both parties must be willing to attend the mediation session. The mediator will then give a brief introduction on the mediation process before deciding whether to continue the session with both parties present, or to hear each party individually.Joint Session with Both PartiesWhere both parties are present, the mediator will have each party explain what their concerns are and what outcome they are hoping to achieve. Parties…

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