Pros & Cons of Online Mediation (Part 2)

pros & cons of online mediation (part 2) By PracticeForte advisory affiliates Christian von Baumbach in collaboration with Susan Tay Pros of Online Mediation If you are reading this article, then you are likely already a believer of mediation. Perhaps you have heard enough good things about mediation to want to understand more?Nonetheless, it is still worthwhile to laud mediation. It is after all, THE modern, flexible, and effective process for solving disputes and making joint decisions in important matters. Through mediation, family members, colleagues, business partners – basically everybody who has an interest in respectful cooperative relationships - can potentially have meaningful discussions, gain a better understanding of each other’s perspectives and regain mutual trust. The goal of each…

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Therapeutic Justice In Family Cases: The Psychologist, Part 7

Therapeutic justice in family cases: The psychologist, part 7 Article By PracticeForte Advisory Affiliate Sylvia Tan Psychologists are mostly trained in assessment and treatment of mental health issues. We undergo four years of undergrad training, two years of post-graduate studies and specialist clinical supervision before we can be registered with a registration board. Psychologists generally end up working in the hospitals, government services or schools, working with individuals with mental health issues such as depression, anxiety, trauma, phobias, etc., through talk-therapy, using evidence-based therapies like Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT). While mental health treatment is usually what psychologists specialize in, some choose to work in the psycho-legal field of family law i.e. working with families undergoing divorce. This is because family…

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Therapeutic Justice in Family Cases: The Mediation Advocate (Part 5)

Therapeutic Justice in Family Cases: The Mediation Advocate(Part 5) By Susan Tay, Co-Founder of PracticeForte & Founder of OTP Law Corporation.This is the 5th part of a series on therapeutic justice and how it may be applied in family cases in Singapore. You may read Part 1 here, Part 2 here, Part 3  and Part 4 here.In these parts, we dealt 1stly with how the essence of Therapeutic Justice for family cases is in the healing. The next parts involve the perspectives and roles of the different players  and they are namely, The Lawyer, The Accountant, The Mediator and in this article, The Mediation Advocate.Family cases will be restricted to divorces and the issues arising out of a divorce. These issues…

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“No one is Above The Law- Probation Sentencing Guidelines in the Case of PP v Terence Siow Kai Yuan”

Article by Emelia Kwa, an associate of OTP Law Corporation.  This article was first published by OTP Law Corporation. When the initial judgment of PP v Terence Siow Kai Yuan [2019] SGMC 69 was released, the case took Singapore’s social media by storm. In case you needed an introduction, the case involved a 22-year-old undergraduate who outraged the modesty of his victim while on the MRT. He was sentenced to 21 months of supervised probation, subject to a number of conditions: 1) remaining indoors from 11pm to 6am, 2) performing 150 hours of community service, 3) attending an offence-specific treatment programme and 4) his parents were to execute a $5,000 bond to ensure his good behaviour during probation. Singaporeans were…

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Managing your children well during the “circuit -breaker” period.

MANAGING YOUR CHILDREN WELL DURING THE "CIRCUIT-BREAKER" PERIOD Article By: PracticeForte Advisory Affiliate Abigail Lee This article was first published by Healing Hearts Centre Home-based learning, telecommuting to work, followed by the first circuit breaker and then an extended circuit breaker, no dining-in at coffee shops or in restaurants could have added to the list of frustrations for you as a parent. Maybe even before the announcement of the circuit breaker extension, you might have been at your wit’s end thinking of ways to remain positive, keep your spirit up and to make things work for your children and yourself during this period of time. Here are some thoughts and ideas to consider both for your children and yourself not…

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An interview with PF’s Co-Founder Susan Tay

Interview with PF's co-founder Susan Tay who is a Director at OTP Law Corporation This article was first published by PracticeForte advisory affiliate OTP Law Corporation. "It’s been 3 years since I conducted an interview with Ms Susan Tay on practice, pupilage (or TCs), and pro bono. Since then, I’ve joined OTP Law Corporation as a trainee and now, an associate. This interview looks at the changes since then, and our reflections". On Training EK: OTP Law Corporation went from having 1 trainee last year to having 3 this year. What was one lesson (or two) that you’ve learnt from having to mentor 3 trainees at one go? ST: I think it is like having 1 child as opposed to…

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Are Parents Always Liable for Their Children’s Maintenance?

Are parents always liable for their children's maintenance? This article was written by Eric Lip and Emelia Kwa, associates at OTP Law Corporation. Both passages below are a fictional re-telling of the facts of the case, to provide each party’s possible perspectives. UYT v UYU - Are parents always liable for their children’s maintenance? A son’s thoughts My parents divorced when I was 8 years old. Back then, they had decided that my dad wouldn’t have to support me financially. For the rest of my life, my mum was the one who single-handedly raised me and supported me, without any help from my dad. Over the years, my dad began life anew and remarried. I now have two step-brothers. My…

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A Thankful Attendee of the Cross-Border Mediation Masterclass

A Thankful Attendee of the Cross-Border Mediation Masterclass This article is written by Chloe Chua Kay Ee - National University of Singapore, Faculty of Law On 16 October 2019, a couple of friends and I attended the Cross-Border Mediation Masterclass jointly organised by PracticeForte, ALSA Singapore and SMU Law International Relations Club. As final year law students who are keen on going into family law, this 4-hour workshop was deeply enriching and beneficial to us. Furthermore, it managed to be what most typical law classes have failed to be, it was fun! The Masterclass could be broadly categorised into 2 categories – the seminars, which equipped us with the fundamentals of cross-border mediation and gave us insight into practical experiences,…

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Recognition of Foreign Divorce In The Philippines: What You Need To Know

RECOGNITION OF FOREIGN DIVORCE IN THE PHILIPPINES: WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW By PracticeForte foreign affiliate member Apolinario L. Caymo II Many Filipinos divorced abroad make the mistake of remarrying without first going through the formalities required by Philippine law. While a divorce abroad dissolves that marriage in that country, this does not mean that the Filipino/Filipina divorcee automatically has the right to marry again under Philippine law. To avoid future inconveniences for divorced Philippine citizens, LEGAL One tackles the most common questions about judicial recognition of foreign divorce decrees. 1. Q: I am a Philippine citizen who obtained a divorce decree in a foreign country. Can I now legally marry under Philippine law? A: No. Before you can legally…

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Adopting the peace approach to avoid unnecessary litigation: The Case of Goh Rosaline v Goh Lian Chyu and another

Adopting the peace approach to avoid litigation: the case of Goh Rosaline v Goh Lian Chyu and another This article is a follow-up to our previous article on the Peace Approach and Children,. This was written by Nur Shukrina Bte Abdul Salam, an intern of OTP Law Corporation. Apart from helping children go through the divorce process and reducing acrimony, the peace approach also reduces unnecessary litigation. This is done by diverting conflicts that can be settled through alternative dispute resolution (“ADR”) to the relevant channels. Courts can thus allocate their resources more efficiently and avoid being treated as a “boxing ring”, i.e. a place where sort out small differences between them whenever they wish. In our view, one such…

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